recipes for citizenship women, cookbooks, and citizenship

recipes for citizenship women, cookbooks, and citizenship
13 views 10 downloads 1.16 M size 105 pages cake

Report DMCA / Copyright

Title : recipes for citizenship women, cookbooks, and citizenship

PDF summary :

Title : (Title)
Author : Kim
Creator : Microsoft® Word 2010
Creationdate : 2012-May-11
Moddate : 2012-May-11
Producer : Microsoft® Word 2010

Preview content in text :

Recipes for Citizenship:
Women, Cookbooks, and Citizenship in the Kitchen, 1941-1945

Kimberly Ann Staub


Thesis submitted to the faculty of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of

Master of Arts
In
History





Kathleen W. Jones (Chair)
Marian B. Mollin
Amy Nelson


May 2, 2012
Blacksburg, VA

Keywords: women, cookbooks, citizenship, domesticity, World War II












Copyright 2012

Recipes for Citizenship:
Women, Cookbooks, and Citizenship in the Kitchen, 1941-1945

Kimberly Ann Staub

ABSTRACT



This thesis argues that cookbooks and cooking literature prescribed domesticity, specifically
linked to the kitchen, as an obligation for American women in World War II. Building on the
work of culinary historians and gender scholars, I argue that the government enlisted women as
“kitchen citizens.” In contrast to the obligations of male military service, government
propaganda, commercially-published cookbooks, community cookbooks, and agriculture
extension pamphlets used understandings of middle-class femininity to prescribe women’s
identity and role in the war effort as homemakers. Despite the popular memory of wartime
women as Rosie-the-Riveters, this thesis suggests that working outside the home was a
temporary and secondary identity. During World War II, cooking literature re-linked women’s
work inside the home to political significance and defined women’s domestic responsibilities as
an obligation of American female citizenship.





Acknowledgements


It is impossible to complete a project like this alone, and I am lucky that I had the
opportunity to work with many very supportive individuals for the past year and a half to help
me finish this thesis. First, I would like to thank the archivists at the Food and Cookery
Collection in Fales Library at NYU, NARA II, and at Special Collections, Newman Library at
Virginia Tech. I could not have completed my research without them. I also want to thank the
Department of History at Virginia Tech and the Peacock-Harper Culinary History Society for
funding my research trips.

My committee, Drs. Kathleen Jones, Marian Mollin, and Amy Nelson, patiently read all
my drafts and for this I am very grateful. Dr. Nelson and Dr. Jones helped transform this thesis
from a tiny idea in the Spring of 2011 into the project it is today, working out the kinks with me
along the way. Last fall, I had the great pleasure to take Dr. Mollin’s Gender in U.S. History
course. I appreciate the extra time she took to chat with me after every class as I struggled each
week to learn and incorporate the historiography of gender studies into my project. All three of
my committee members believed in me and in this project. I am so thankful for their support. I
can only hope that the final product stands as a testament to the great questioning, mentoring,
and feedback they gave me.

Finally, I’d like to thank my family, especially my parents, for their unconditional love

and support. They may not have always understood what I was doing or what I was working on,
but they encouraged me to give it my best effort. Lastly, I’d like to dedicate this thesis to my
grandmother. Listening to her stories about rationing and “making-do” on the World War II
home front as a child planted the seed for this project, long before either of us was aware of it.







iii

Table of Contents

Introduction …………………………………………………………………………………. 1

Chapter One
Making Food and Women Fight for Freedom:
Government, Women, and the “Food Situation” …………………………………………... 15

Chapter Two
Mass-Producing Kitchen Citizens:
Commercial Cookbooks and Citizenship in World War II ………………….…………..… 41

Chapter Three
Kitchen Citizenship at the Local Level?:
Community Cookbooks, Home Economists, and Projections of Domestic Identity………....65

Conclusion ……………………………………………………………………………….…..86

Bibliography………………………………………………………………………………….90



List of Images:
Image 1: “Warfax on Sugar”. .…………………………………………………………….. ..23
Image 2: “Without Rationing” …………………………………………………………….. ..28
Image 3: “The Key 7”……………………………………………………………………… ..47
Image 4: “Vitamins for Victory”……………………………………………………..…… . .52





iv

Introduction

In 1943, the middle of U.S. involvement in World War II, General Mills published its

wartime cookbook titled Your Share: How to Prepare Appetizing, Healthful Meals with Foods

Available Today. Newly released ration guidelines limited the food resources available to

American civilians and the authors planned the book to help women, widely recognized as the

family cooks, create healthy and satisfying meals, all while promoting General Mills products.

Alongside advertisements for Bisquick and advice on how to serve your vegetables appeared a

short, but telling mantra:

At the end of the day, let us be sure we can say:
‘I worked for freedom today.
I served at least one food from each of the basic seven food groups.
I prepared the food I served with care.
I wasted no food this day.’1


This verse had little to do with cooking and everything to do with the obligations and duties

facing women who juggled increased workloads, ration books, and their families’ changing

needs during wartime. It reflects the social and cultural significance of food, its preparation, and

consumption. Whether through recommending alternate cuts of meats, promoting Victory

Gardens, or providing new recipes for baking the perfect layer cake using as little sugar as

possible, cookbook authors emphasized the political implications of women’s domestic work.

This thesis analyzes the way cookbooks and food-related propaganda projected gendered

obligations for American women during World War II, using food to link domesticity,

particularly food preparation, to female citizenship.


1 Betty Crocker, Your Share: How to Prepare Appetizing, Healthful Meals with Foods Available Today
(Minneapolis: General Mills, 1943), 37. Emphasis in original.

1





Related Recipes :

easy coconut cake recipes with cake mix
20 4 71.33 K 2 pages

easy coconut cake recipes with cake mix

Author : Vulirogufa Nexosuyi
Toasted Coconut   Kilwins |
19 2 4.51 M 3 pages

Toasted Coconut Kilwins |

Author : acrandell
Chocolate Peanut. Butter Fudge. Peanut Butter . Kilwins "Original Recipe". Hand-Packed Ice Cream Quarts . Gourmet Cake & Ice. Cream 10". Toasted Coconut.
dessert    Windross House Restaurant
26 2 3 M 2 pages

dessert Windross House Restaurant

Mount Gay Silver Rum, Fresh Lime, Sugar Syrup, Mint Leaves,. Soda. Amaretto Sour . BYO Cake Incurs a Charge of $20. DESSERT WINE. G B .
kodiak cakes recipes blueberry muffins
19 12 64.38 K 2 pages

kodiak cakes recipes blueberry muffins

Author : Pecayalovu Tovanodo
pancake recipes! quick and easy pancake recipes with this
23 6 72.59 K 10 pages

pancake recipes! quick and easy pancake recipes with this

Author : Content Arcade Publishing, Les Ilagan
southern lemon pound cake recipes from scratch
11 6 73.38 K 2 pages

southern lemon pound cake recipes from scratch

Author : Vexeyo Dirocu
clodagh mckenna s recipes rteie
15 7 548.97 K 6 pages

clodagh mckenna s recipes rteie

Author : donohua
simple ice cream cake roll recipe
20 9 59.34 K 2 pages

simple ice cream cake roll recipe

Author : Tusixi Yupuzaxo
Chocolate Cake(without eggs)   BBC
27 5 451.1 K 2 pages

Chocolate Cake(without eggs) BBC

comes out clean when removed from the centre of the cake). Based on a recipe from BBC WWII People's War collection (cornwallcsv). Chocolate Cake(without .